Therapeutic Strategies

These strategies are aimed at improving the function of specific aspects of swallowing that are in part voluntary. They require a patient with capacity to learn and collaborate; in practise this means that a significant portion of patients with neurogenic dysphagia will be excluded. They include swallowing manoeuvres and motor-control exercises.These strategies are aimed at improving the function of specific aspects of swallowing that are in part voluntary. They require a patient with capacity to learn and collaborate; in practise this means that a significant portion of patients with neurogenic dysphagia will be excluded. They include swallowing manoeuvres and motor-control exercises.

Swallowing Manoeuvres

The aim of these is to improve the efficacy and safety of swallowing by voluntary control over certain aspects of swallowing. These manoeuvres require the patient to follow a sequence of instructions and use their swallowing musculature (which will exclude many patients with dysphagia of a neurogenic aetiology). These manoeuvres may be used during swallowing, but also train the swallowing muscles, and are therefore a good muscular exercise.

Motor Control Exercices

These exercises are aimed at improving the strength and mobility of the structures involved in swallowing (lips, chewing muscles, floor of the mouth, tongue, soft palate, larynx and glottic closure).